2015 Imaginary Shells

What do I do with all the unsuccessful (i.e. bad) Shell Essence drawings in which there are only some areas and marks that I like? Of course, cut them out! With scissors, I clip along and around desired line and shapes. Surprise! The negative shapes are as interesting as those drawn. Pieces are saved and and categorized by similarities. Then, the shells are redrawn by new placement of those cut out pieces.

Weaving lines and forms positive and negative in a rotational movement in many cases around a central core creates an undulating space. A familiar object is then reconstructed in a different way taking it into an imaginary realm. Does it remain a shell or become something that is shell-like? Or, does it morph into something totally different? Those questions find answers as the compositions form and reform until tuition makes a final decision.

The process of collage mimics childhood “construction paper” projects. The only sound is that of the constant clipping of the scissors. Pieces scatter to the table and to the floor. Line and shape placement is shuffled until satisfied. Fingers get sticky with glue. This is fun. This experience translates into the process where gut feelings along with formal ideas come together to make the images. The resulting works are then open to the maker’s and the viewer’s imagination.

While working on the Imaginary Shells, I started to study the organized cut out shapes and finding a few that were intriguing enough to be stand alone pieces. I pondered, “What can I do with just two pieces and how will they interact with one another on the page?”. The result resembled marks that could be elements used in writing to separate sentences and clarify meaning. My thoughts came to language and Punctuation marks. In the meantime, the Punctuation has become more complex and taken a direction from elements toward meaning.